New Category: MorphedWords

Since I screwed up and used the NotWord morphed in my posting yesterday, I’ve created a new category wherein common and acceptable English words get bastardized into forms and meanings never originally intended.  In short, to employ a NotWord (which has been now joined by new category), these words have been morphed.  Hence the name for my new category: [tag]MorphedWords[/tag].

What was the first MorphedWord?

I’m sure it was something hundreds of years ago (after all, English is a hybrid bastard of a language to begin with).  But the one I remember from the early 1990s was impacted.  Now, all through my K-12 and college years and well into adulthood, impact had been a noun, nothing more, nothing less.

Suddenly it became a verb:  “The unemployment rate has impacted the economy,” and so on.  Surely, this was some kind of bureaucratic, elitist term that originated in government, but it’s not worth researching.  It’s only worth lamenting.

I blame it all on [tag]Bill Clinton[/tag], who came to office about the same time and led the deculturalization of America.  “I can feel your pain,” he would say, and then add as a mental note, “It has favorably impacted my chances of defeating Bush.”  Evil grin, concomitant chuckle.

I’m no doubt stretching matters here a bit, but this same Clinton did concoct one of the most memorable and nonsensical sentences in English language history:  “It depends on what the meaning of is is.”  (It gets worse even as our history darkens.  Read this.)

I guess I’ll have to come up with a category for NotSentences next.

Evil me.  I’ve been impacted unjustly.  Can you feel my pain?

One thought on “New Category: MorphedWords

  1. John says:

    “English words get bastardized into forms and meanings never originally intended.”

    That would be all words, since semantic change is an observed phenomenon in all languages.

    Nouns changing into verbs is a common feature of English. Curb, date, elbow, interview, panic, and park are all verbs that started as nouns. According to the American Heritage Dictionary, “Impact has been used as a verb since 1601, when it meant “to fix or pack in,” and its modern, figurative use dates from 1935.”

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